Holiday Sock Drive — Receive $5 Off of Your Class Card Purchase this Nov & Dec when you donate socks and other necessities

Celebrate seva, the art of giving, this season by participating in our

Holiday Sock Drive

Holiday Sock Drive to Benefit the Children's Program of the Family Inn

Receive $5 off your class card purchase when you bring in one of the following items

for The Family Inn of Family of Woodstock.

  • Conair round brushes
  • Wide toothed combs
  • Socks & underwear (new, please. For infant, toddler, children, and teens)
  • Baby equipment (strollers, crib sheets, bouncy chairs, baby swing, etc.)
  • Baby bottles (specific request for tommee tippee bottles)
  • Humidifiers
  • Baby crib sheets
  • Twin sheets & pillows
  • Robes & slippers (for toddlers & kids)

 

November Focus of the Month — Sukha

autumn foliageSukha

We’ve been blessed with an extended, mild and colorful fall replete with shin-high sidewalk piles of crackling gold and burnt sienna. And have you seen the green underbellies of the leaves this year? It’s as though they’re hanging on for dear life as reluctant as we are to bid a farewell to sun and warmth. It’s undeniable though. We may be having a few mercifully temperate days, but November is really here and with it come the colder, darker skies. Unless you’re a winter bird, you’re probably beginning to feel the tenseness of the season. We clench up this time of year, we draw inward, we resist, protest, get sad, anticipate and even dread. If these inclinations sound familiar to you, please join us in a great metaphorical counterpose this November, the cultivation of a profound ease of being.

This month we focus on sukha, a Sanskrit word meaning joy, ease, pleasure, softness, gentleness, or bliss. Often it gets paired with its counterpart sthira, which means steadiness and firmness, the idea being that yogis – whether they’re executing a pose, sitting for meditation or encountering daily life – are adept at balancing these two qualities. Too much force and your practice is fraught with rigidity. Too little firmness and you’re all stretch but no strength. The texts go so far as to say, if you don’t have both you’re not doing yoga.

You might know the feeling. Let’s say you’re executing a new and challenging pose. You get in, you’re doing it! Then, just as soon, you collapse onto the floor gasping for breath realizing you’d been holding it in all along. There is reason to feel good about the accomplishment, no doubt, but it’ll take a dozen or more times before you experience the lift and lightness that are possible in yoga asana.

You might hear us saying in class, “Find a comfortable edge.” This is a nod toward the sthira/sukha balance. Yoga does require that you push beyond your boundaries, but there should be a sense of yielding in your push, a softness, a patience, a kindness, and a sensitivity as you progress in your practice. Yoga is not meant to be painful or forceful, it’s meant to enhance joy, to put a lightness in your step and a lift in your heart. Anything else is, as they say, calisthenics. If you’re keeping sukha in mind, you still attempt those elusive poses, but you keep a careful eye on your breath, and you allow the process to be sweetly slow. You’ll get there, you’ll get there, there’s no rush, and you’ll be less likely to get injured along the way.

Leslie Kaminoff, author of “Yoga Anatomy,” describes sukha at the cellular level using the concepts of containment and permeability. A cell’s outer layer, he points out, must be firm enough to remain a cohesive entity but permeable enough to allow nutrients in and waste out. It’s quite a feat, isn’t it? If either of these qualities is missing, existence as we know it falls apart. So too in our human relations. We must have resolve and stability if we are to survive, but if we are to flourish we must have adaptability too. Some situations call for a certain severity, but we cannot forget to also be soft lest we make ourselves (and everyone around us) miserable.

Here’s something you can try. Next time you take a yoga class, experiment with creating more sukha than sthira in the practice. Slow down, back off, ease up. Drink in your breath like it’s a sweet, silken nectar. If the teacher invites you to try something that’s going to pull you too far out of your comfort zone be bold enough to decline. Don’t go deep unless it feels amazing to go deep. In the pinnacle moment of your poses, allow your heart to swell beyond its former capacity. In each moment that you can, actively shed your resentments and criticisms toward self and others. Let your chest burst wide open with compassion and love. This is sukha… and we need more of it!

Sukha is joy, pleasure, softness, easeIt’s characteristic of the society in which we were reared that we sometimes approach our yoga practice with a sense of ambition or competition. Deep down, of course, we know that that kind of approach pulls us away from the more metaphysical side of the practice, the side that reminds us we are each just one small part of a bigger whole. Sustaining awareness of our interconnection is what the sages call reaching enlightenment. In a state of enlightenment we cannot help but experience feelings of belonging, warmth, profound gratitude, joy, and altruism, the many shades of sukha. It’s okay that we’re always getting pulled back down to earth because the door to bliss is always there and it’s always wide open, if we can only remember to look for it.

 

 

 

Community Class Gathering & Info Session — Nov. 9th, 6:15pm

Creating a Yogic Community: Giving In & Giving Back

A Gathering & Informational Chat

with Fran Benton, Supervisor of the Children’s Program of Family Inn

Hosted by Amy Reed

Sunday, November 9th, 6:15pm

Refreshments will be served. 

Fran will join us immediately following the Community class to provide information about the organization and a thoughtful retrospective on how your weekly donations have impacted her children and families in our community.

Attend both the class and gathering, or skip the class and just mellow out afterwards with some amazing Kingstonites as we get to know Fran and the wonderful work she does.

Amy Reed, The Yoga House, Teacher, Yoga, Kingston, NYThe Community Class

Held each Sunday from 5:00-6:15pm invites you to connect more deeply to selfless service (Seva) and the art of giving. Proceeds from each class benefit The Family Inn Program of Family of Woodstock Inc., a United Way Agency. Teacher Amy Reed encourages students to tap into the root of the yogic philosophy of kindness in thought and deed. It is remarkable what doing for others does for the soul!

AcroYoga Meet-Ups — Would YOU be interested?

Thanks to all who attended Adi’s flying workshop earlier this month. It’s got us thinking about hosting a weekly meet-up for anyone interested in a little Acro play. If you’re interested, please be in touch (via email is best). We want to know there are takers before we get it running. info@theyogahouseny.com

 

 

AcroYoga

A workshop with Adi Carter

Saturday, October 25th
12:00-2:00pm   $25

 

 

Acro Yoga The Yoga House Kingston NYThe Workshop
AcroYoga blends the spiritual wisdom of Yoga, the loving kindness of Thai massage, and the dynamic power of Acrobatics. These three ancient lineages form the foundation of a unique new practice that cultivates trust, connection and playfulness.  This workshop will focus on using core awareness to help practitioners balance on each other and take flight to truly experience the joy of being inverted and supported without the effort and struggle of trying to hold yourself up.

 

Open to everyone, there will be an emphasis on therapeutic flying to stretch the shoulders, release tight hips and open up the back in backbends.  Feel free to come with a partner but it is also fun to come by yourself as you will get to work with a bunch of new people who usually become your friends soon there after.

 

PR_headshot2Adi Carter Bio
Adi has been a life long student of practicing yoga off the mat in all shapes and forms especially when it involves being outdoors. Her passion for movement and the environment have taken her on adventures around the world to share the modalities of shifting perspective through yoga, slacklining, AcroYoga, climbing, surfing, mountain biking and just about anything else you can think to do on the Earth’s terrain. Traveling & teaching often times with her car as a home base, you can find her somewhere in the vicinity of an ocean, climb site, mountain or legit climbing tree as she works with students on and off the mat to discover a new sense of balance, strength and focus in whatever their form of practice might be. www.adicarter.com

AcroYoga



The Art of Relaxation — Yoga and Healing Touch w/ Emma Silverman, Sat. 11/8, 1:30-3:30pm

The Art of Relaxation: Yoga and Healing Touch

with author Emma Silverman
Saturday, Nov. 8, 1:30-3:30pm
$25 door / $20 by Nov. 5th

 

Emma Silverman Art of Relaxation Yoga Workshop The Yoga House Kingston NY

 

The Art of Relaxation workshop is a gentle, guided flow with massage, adjustments, and juicy yoga postures sure to stretch you into yoga heaven. Join author and yoga instructor Emma Silverman for this incredible opportunity to experience the healing powers of touch and to deepen your practice. This restorative class will guide you into bliss.

 

 

 

Emma Silverman is the author and founder of the blog The Emma Silverman Yoga Workshop The Yoga House Kingston NY Joy of Yoga. Her yoga journey began with dedicated Iyengar study and, after more than fifteen years of practice, she has also studied Bikram, Ashtanga, Kundalini, and Vinyasa Flow. After working at the Kripalu Institute for Yoga and Health (North America’s largest yoga retreat center), she is currently a yoga instructor at Cornell University, with thousands of students worldwide. Her previous book, THE JOY OF YOGA, will be published by Skyhorse Publishing (forthcoming August 5, 2014) and has sold German, Italian, Spanish, and Chinese translation rights. She resides in Ithaca, New York.

 

Register Below by Nov. 5th:


Art of Healing Workshop




Evening Meditation with Sharon Rosen — Every 3rd Friday, 7-8:00pm. Next Session Nov. 21st

Evening Meditation

7:00-8:00pm, third Fridays

Our next meditation event is on November 21st, 2014.

Drop-in fee is $13 (or use your membership card).

Leave the week behind and enter your weekend in peace. Join us for this month’s class, where the focus will be shamatha (calm abiding) and metta (loving-kindness) meditation. Deepen your ability to be present, compassionate and loving towards yourself and with others. Our time together includes instruction, inspiration and practice. Developing mindful awareness through meditation allows us to “bloom like the lotus, at home in the muddy water.”

meditation
Join us every third Friday for an hour-long guided meditation led by teacher and author Sharon Rosen. No experience necessary. All levels welcome.

According to Sharon, “Meditation helps us to become more present to life. Through the practices, we develop feelings of unconditional friendliness towards ourselves and others. Each month we will explore different aspects of meditation, including mindfulness, lovingkindness, walking meditation and guided body scans. You will leave these sessions inspired, refreshed and with solid tools that you can weave into your everyday life. Please join us and begin or deepen your own meditation journey.”

Preregistration is NOT necessary, but feel free to reserve your spot.


Reserve My Spot for Evening Meditation


sharon rosen, meditationSharon Rosen

(Read more at her website, Heart of Self Care)

Life is filled with bright, shiny objects that distract us, knock us off track, and keep us from knowing our truest needs. They pull us away from our core values and innate wisdom.

How do we figure out what really works for us?

I believe that we all have the ability to find those answers, even if we can’t always access that wisdom or follow through on it. It has to do with slowing down and listening deeply, two things that are not given much respect in this world of information overload. High speed, next generation wireless networks keep us always plugged in out there but not in here where it helps the most.

The essence of what I teach and embody in my work comes from learning to listen deeply to myself. It’s about paying mindful attention to my body and soul to figure out what works for me. I’ve learned how to give myself what I need to truly flourish and feel strong and vibrant. I feel so grateful to be able to share this learning with you.