Monthly Amma Satsang Now on First Sundays

Monthly Satsang

First Sundays at our Uptown Studio

Next one: Sunday, August 6th, 7pm

 

Amma is with a gathering of her children at a rest stop on tour and smiles sweetly at everyone.

Please join us for an Amma Satsang: An open chanting and meditation group in the tradition of Sri Mata Amritanandamayi Devi. Through chanting the 108 Names of the Divine Mother in Sanskrit we practice Bhakti Yoga, the yoga of devotion. Chanting also clears the mind for meditation. Whether you come and listen to our musicians or join us in chanting, please come to experience this ancient practice. Satsang means, “in the company of truth.” As we clear our minds and open our hearts, we can dwell in our essence.

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Ashtanga Yoga Workshop – Friday, Feb. 24th, 7-9pm

Ashtanga Yoga:

Self-Discovery Through Practice and Patience

With Jacqui Nash

Friday, February 24th, 7-9pm

$25

The principles of the traditional practice of Ashtanga Yoga can bring a deeper sense of awareness and connection to your practice no matter what style of of yoga you practice. Join E-RYT and The Yoga House co-owner Jacqui Nash to learn about the systems of energies, breath and focus established in the Ashtanga lineage which help create a stronger practice, both physically and spiritually. We’ll dive into the incorporation of these elements to bring you into a fuller awareness of the self while practicing any style of yoga. We’ll also go over some sticking points in the Ashtanga practice in order to feel comfortable with where your body is in the asanas and to find your full potential every time you practice, whether it be Ashtanga or Vinyasa Yoga. All practitioners, new and experienced, welcome.

*3 Continuing Education credits earned for existing RYTs with the Yoga Alliance.


Ashtanga Workshop



Chakra Workshop, Saturday, Jan. 14, 2:30-5:30pm

Chakra Workshop with Corinne Gervai

Saturday, Jan. 14, 2:30-5:30pm

chakrasymbolssimpleIn this workshop on the Chakras System lead by Corinne Gervai of Euphoria Yoga in Woodstock we will explore what these energy center are, where they are located, what the sounds, senses, colors, elements, symbols that are associated with each one are and how they relate to various aspects of our lives. We will also explore how to weave this information into an Asana (Yogic Postures) class that relates to the various Chakras.

A hand out with information on the Chakras will be provided, so that you can reference the information during the Workshop with ease, as well as in the future when you wish to incorporate it in your classes once you are a Teacher! * A few fun tips on how to remember some of the information by heart will be offered as well.  Corinne is very much looking forward to sharing this time and this rich subject with you!

corinne-2Corinne Gervai is the founder and Director of Euphoria Yoga in Woodstock and has over thirteen years of teaching experience in New York city and locally. She received her Yoga Teaching certification from the Jivamukti Yoga School in the year 2000 after completing the full one year intensive certification program lead by Sharon Gannon and David Life. Corinne taught all levels at The Jivamukti Yoga School in New York City from 2000-2005. Prior to that Corinne taught the Lotte Berk Method which incorporates element of Yoga, dance and therapeutic stretching in New York city and the Hamptons.In 2005 Corinne received her Advanced Jivamukti certification. Upon moving to Woodstock full time in 2005 Corinne taught locally until 2009 when she opened Euphoria Yoga. Corinne offers much gratitude to her main Yoga teachers Sharon Gannon, David Life as well as to all the wonderful teachers that she takes classes and workshops with which continue to inspire her. Corinne offers deep thanks to her beloved students, family and friends that enhance her life daily and her aim is to do the same to the lives of as many beings as she can reach.


Chakra Workshop



Monday Night Chant Sessions

Monday Night Chant Sessions

Every Monday 8:15pm

Beginning October 3rd

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We’re excited to announce that beginning Monday, Oct. 3, The Yoga House will be hosting Monday Night Chant Sessions led by the studio co-owner, Jacqui Nash, at 8:15pm (after the 7pm House Flow class). Each week, we’ll explore the use of music and the vibration of our voices with traditional chants and mantras and the accompaniment of the harmonium as an extension of meditation and of connection to our practice. The sessions will be about 30 minutes, and attendance at the 7pm is not necessary. We hope that you will join us! These sessions are free of charge.

May Focus: Meditation & The Last Three Limbs of Yoga

May Focus of the Month

Meditation & The Last Three Limbs

meditation focus the yoga house kingston new york yoga hudson valley

The first yogis aimed to solve a problem that still pervades today. It’s called the “monkey mind,” and it refers to the ever-firing, overly anxious human brainscape that has added a layer of frazzle and fret to our already-fraught condition. A complete yoga practice is designed to give us enough clarity to see our experiences for what they are rather than through the carnival mirror-style distortion of emotionally reactive, memory-attached consciousness. If you were to crack open the Yoga Sutras, you would not have to get very far to see how important a meditation practice is as part of the yogi’s journey. Sutra #1 says, essentially, “Following are the teachings of yoga….” Sutra #2 goes on to say, “The purpose of yoga is to still our thoughts. If you master this sutra, you need not read on to the rest.”

Meditation occupies some significant territory on yoga’s eight-limbed ladder, taking up three of the last three rungs on the climb toward enlightenment. The breakdown is fascinating:

Dharana, the 6th limb, has to do with concentration. The suggestion is to fix your mind upon an object until you become so absorbed that there is little room for the mind to do much needless worrying or past/future travel as it is wont to do. A funny fable tells us of an acolyte meditator who once shut his door and fixed his mind upon a bull until he barreled out of the room with horns and hooves himself. The take-home is twofold: Be as focused as this acolyte, but be wary of where you place your attention.

From the recommendation to concentrate upon a single object spring many forms of modern-day meditation: from mantra and japam meditation, or repetition of a significant sound; to guided visualizations; to the use of a talisman; to the use of a drishti, or focal point; to the tuning in to a single sense, such as hearing or touch; to the holding in mind of a spiritual figure. Dharana is an essential practice that prepares the mind for deeper states of contemplation.

Dhyana, yoga’s 7th limb, comes closer to the definition of meditation as we think of it, the suggestion being to sustain concentration for a prolonged period of time, fixing the mind upon a single object while quelling the tendency to name, categorize, judge, or assign value to that which is in focus. To sit in this style of meditation is to see reality with perfect clarity, leading to an awareness unstained by the ego’s preferences or priorities. Eventually, the yogi’s subject becomes the Self that dwells within the self, and he/she abides in sacred, nondual reality.

Eight Limbs of Yoga

When the mind succeeds in accurately reflecting reality, the yogi perceives her true nature in which self and other are unified. To sustain this clarity of consciousness is to live in Samadhi, or liberation, the 8th limb. A meditation practice helps us to collect more and more moments of pure awareness so that we may finally reside around the clock in “bliss that defies description.” Those who have experienced samadhi describe it as a coming home or as an experience of sweetness and peace that cannot be conveyed in words. Paramahansa Yogananda offers as vivid an account of samadhi as is available, describing it over the course of many paragraphs in Autobiography of a Yogi:

Soul and mind instantly lost their physical bondage and streamed out like a fluid light from my every pore…  My sense of identity was no longer narrowly confined to a body but embraced the circumambient atoms…My ordinary frontal vision was now changed to a vast spherical sight, simultaneously all-perceptive… An oceanic joy broke upon calm endless shores of my soul. The entire cosmos, gently luminous, like a city seen afar at night, glimmered within the infinitude of my being….

Brain & Meditation

Excitingly, scientists have discovered that meditation really does help keep ego in check, increase empathy, and provide mental clarity, affirming the claims yogis have been making for millennia. Neuroscientists have identified the portions of the brain responsible for emotional reactivity, autobiographical memory (or ego) creation, self/other distinctions, present-centered attention, and time/space awareness. Interestingly, these locations in the brain become markedly restful during deep states of meditation, and a regular meditation practice increases gray matter in many of these regions, helping us to function optimally even when the meditation session has concluded.

Although we often begin and end class with a brief meditation, we will place special emphasis this May on listening to the silence beneath the sound and to heeding the call of highest consciousness. We look forward to sharing these sweet moments on the mat!

In peace,

 

Leigha & Jacqui