Practice Inspirations: Core Yoga Concepts Workshop with Laura Olson, Sat. 2/2

Practice Inspirations: Core Yoga Concepts

with Laura Olson

Saturday, Feb. 2, 12:00-2:00pm

Midtown Studio

$30 pre-register/ $35 day-of


So often in yoga class there isn’t time to slow down and talk about details or dive deeply and talk about the bigger concepts. In this workshop you will learn about some key concepts of yoga, and why when we put them into action yoga really works. We’ll talk about breath or vinyasa, energy locks or bandha, gaze points or dristi and postures or asana as vehicles for transformation then put them into practice right away, and much more. There will be plenty of time for questions and discussion.

 

Laura Olson

As a former dancer, Laura has always been kinesthetic, but yoga is what made her finally feel at home. A devoted Ashtangi and reverently rebellious yoga teacher, she has studied extensively in the United States as well as in Mysore, India with Sri K. Pattabhi Jois and Sharath Jois. Laura teaches both traditional Ashtanga as well as Ashtanga-influenced vinyasa in workshops, classes, and private lessons in the New York City and Woodstock areas. She also offers cooking classes and health coaching and most delights in making healthy indulgences for everyone. She offers deep gratitude to all the friends, mentors and teachers who have guided her and kept her company along the path.

 

 

 

 

   
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Free Asthanga Info Session, Saturday, 1/26, 11:15am

Free Ashtanga Info Session

Saturday, 1/26, 11:15am

with Laura Olson & Jacquelyn Nash

Midtown Studio

Over the last two years, you may have noticed more weekly Ashtanga offerings at The Yoga House, and it may have brought about some questions about this mysterious style of yoga. We want to demystify this practice and open the conversation about what ashtanga yoga is about and answer any lingering questions you might have. Join Ashtanga instructors Laura Olson and Jacquelyn Nash for this free info session intended to help you gain some insight about the Ashtanga practice and determine whether this might be a path you’d like to embark on. All are welcome.

Read more about the Asthanga Practice here and learn about our Asthanga program here.

RSVP to our Free Info Session here

(it’s not necessary to RSVP to hold your spot.)

Meditation Intensive Module, with Aaron Dias, Feb. 8-10

Meditation: Traversing the Inner World

February 8-10, 2019

Teacher: Aaron Dias

YTT 200 hour, yoga teacher training, hudson valley, kingston, ny, modulesMeditation is the most fundamental spiritual practice of all because it develops our most valuable asset of all–our awareness. Sharing just a few simple tools and insights, Aaron teaches you how to overcome common obstacles and develop a practice that is steady, satisfying, authentic to your own path and wildly effective in helping you reach your goals. We will devote the rest of the weekend to the study of the energy body–which effects everything about your lived experience on the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual levels. Though you may not be able to see the subtle body (yet!) everyone can learn how to detect it and learn what it needs. By the end of the weekend you will feel much more confident about who you are, what you need and how to make it all fall into balance.

Learn:

  • the tools you need to establish a committed self-meditation practice.
  • how to translate the information that your own energy body is trying to share.
  • to become the authority on your own spiritual development.
Aaron Dias
Aaron is a facilitator of spiritual evolution who, through one-on-one coaching as well as group experiences, has helped hundreds of individuals discover their own innate capacity for healing, insight and positive transformation. She is initiated in the Q’ero lineage of the High Andes and has extensive training in various other enlightenment traditions and energy systems, most notably Mahayana Buddhism, Tantric Yoga and Taoism. She combines this knowledge with a lifetime as a wordsmith, philosopher, theater-maker and nature-enthusiast to model her highest values–authenticity, courage, integrity, wisdom and, most of all love–and to mirror back to you your own best self.

 


Meditation



November Focus: Satya, Truthfulness

November Focus

Satya: Truthfulness

Image result for truthfulness

 

What an interesting world we’re living in right now, where truthfulness, accountability, and right action are commonly questioned and looked at with a discerning eye. Luckily, we aspiring yogis who f
ollow the path of the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali are required to always be truthful through one of the social disciplines, or yamas. That social discipline is that of satya, which literally means “to speak the truth,” and while in theory it seems easy enough, there are many levels of the truthfulness that could create obstacles when working toward on honest existence. Below are some things to consider about our daily lives and following the discipline of truthfulness as we journey on our yogic path.

 

When one thinks of speaking the truth, we naturally associate that with our communication with others. In a paper published in 2010 in Human Communication Research, psychologist found that the average number of lies people tell per day is 1.65 lies. Doing pretty good, people! We might think that it would be higher considering that in our present society, the modes of communication seem endless. We have face to face, phone, snail mail (what’s that?), email, text, social media, and we’d think that each allow for a little more bending of the truth than the next. However, according to research done at Cornell University, the use of technology keeps us more honest, realizing that there’s a “digital trail” (formerly known as a paper trail, remember that?). We actually end up lying more face to face or over the phone because there is no record of what was said. Hmmm, sounds like we might need to work on the correlation between our audial communication and our “little white lies.”

 

Next, in regards to satya, how honest are we with ourselves? This is a different level of honesty where there is only personal accountability. Another way of thinking about lying to ourselves is the big ‘D’ word: Denial. You may have heard this acronym before, “Don’t Even Notice I Am Lying.” According to an article in Psychology Today there are 8 most common lies we tell ourselves, which include ignorance is bliss, how we like to be seen, and cherry picking data. (If you want to read the full article, click here.) While denial and self-deception may be an evolutionary survival skill, having awareness of our common self-lies might be a good method for us to stop and reflect on some of your own motivations and what you consider to be your “personal truths.”

 

The last aspect of truthfulness that we’ll mention is that of the honesty behind our actions. In yoga philosophy, we are asked over and over again to look at the intention behind the deeds that we do. The Buddha delineates the distinction between right and wrong intention. Right intention includes the intention of renunciation, the intention of good will, and the intention of harmlessness. The opposite intentions include the intention governed by desire, the intention governed by ill will, and the intention governed by harmfulness. Right intention is the basis for right thinking and truthful and non-deceitful actions.

 

This post is only to offer some moments of self-reflection and self-study, which is naturally part of our ongoing yoga practice. We’ll finish with the words from Swami Satchidananda about satya, “With establishment in honesty, the state of fearlessness comes. One need not be afraid of anybody and can always lead an open life. When there are no lies, the entire life becomes an open book. But this comes only with an absolutely honest mind. When the mind becomes clear and serene, the true Self reflects without disfigurement, and we realize the Truth in its own original nature.” Sounds to us like to bliss and real freedom.

 

In gratitude & service,

Jacquelyn & Leigha